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In-Box Review
172
B-36 turret set
B-36 front gun turrets and thier compartment
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by: Andy Brazier [ BETHEYN ]


Originally published on:
AeroScale

history
The Convair B-36 "Peacemaker" was a strategic bomber built by Convair and operated solely by the United States Air Force (USAF) from 1949 to 1959. The B-36 was the largest mass-produced piston engine aircraft ever made. It had the longest wingspan of any combat aircraft ever built at 230 ft (70.1 m). The B-36 was the first bomber capable of delivering any of the nuclear weapons in the U.S. arsenal from inside its four bomb bays without aircraft modifications. With a range of 16,000 km (9,900 mi) and a maximum payload of 33,000 kg (73,000 lb), the B-36 was the world's first manned bomber with an unrefueled intercontinental range. Until it was replaced by the jet powered Boeing B-52 Stratofortress, which first became operational in 1955, the B-36 was the primary nuclear weapons delivery vehicle of the Strategic Air Command (SAC), and the B-36 set the standard for range and payload for subsequent U.S. intercontinental bombers.
Info from Wikipedia

in the box
Packed in a small robust cardboard box, the 22 resin parts are packed in 2 re-sealable bags.
The Monogram kit doesn't have the turrets included in the kit, so surgery is required to install the turrets and the compartment, but it is just a matter of cutting along the panel lines. The instructions show where to cut and how to install.
The parts are crisply moulded with no sign of any discrepancies in the resin.
The turret compartment has some nice detail moulded onto the inside of the part, in the way of hydraulic lines, .ammo bins and two servos(?).
The turrets are made up of five parts each, the two barrels are well detailed with the rubber recoil parts well reproduced in this small scale.
The inside of the compartment has ammo belts to be installed and the turret mountings.
Two turret bay doors complete the parts.
All the parts are on casting blocks, and look pretty easy to remove.

instructions
The instructions are printed on an A4 size sheet, and are in the familiar black on white line drawings.
The first page covers the build sequence which is over nine steps and is pretty easy to follow. No internal colours are given for any of the parts so checking references is a must.
The reverse side of the instruction sheet is installing the turret compartment into the fuselage of the aircraft, after cutting out the appropriate panel lines. The last part is attaching the turret doors to the side of the fuselage.

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SUMMARY
Highs: nice detail, easy to build
Lows: no internal colours given
Verdict: This is a good set to use for any of the early B-36 bombers. The Monogram kit doesn't include these parts at all, so any kit with these installed will look a lot more interesting.
Percentage Rating
85%
  Scale: 1:72
  Mfg. ID: U 72-156
  Suggested Retail: 21.50 (Hannants)
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Nov 13, 2014
  NATIONALITY: United States
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 84.81%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 88.99%

Our Thanks to Pavla Models!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Andy Brazier (betheyn)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH EAST, UNITED KINGDOM

I started modelling in the 70's with my Dad building Airfix aircraft kits. The memory of my Dad and I building and painting a Avro Lancaster on the kitchen table will always be with me. I then found a friend who enjoyed building models, and between us I think we built the entire range of 1/72 Airfi...

Copyright 2019 text by Andy Brazier [ BETHEYN ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of ModelGeek. All rights reserved.



   

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