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In-Box Review
HO scale
Plate Girder Bridge
Code 100 Plate Girder Bridge ''Frisco''
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by: Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]

Introduction
Plate Girder Bridge from Atlas is a styrene and metal rail HO model. It is item 70 000 032. Atlas tells us;
    Based on a common prototype, Atlas' detailed HO Code 100 Plate Girder Bridge is now decorated for well-known railroads across the country. These bridges are made with the same high-quality construction you've come to expect from Atlas.

Atlas also makes this model in O scale and N scale.
The Model
This model is a pony truss-type, or half-through bridge. Atlas packs it in their red box with a cellophane window. each end of the bridge is secured in a plastic cradle.

This is a one-piece molding of black styrene with nickle-silver rails. Atlas includes two rail joiners.

The bridge is nine inches long, the standard of tangent snap-track. That makes it a tad over a scale 65'.

No abutments nor piers are provided. They can be purchased separately. The design of this bridge allows modelers to have the visual and imaginative joy of watching trains roll through a bridge without having to raise the bridge above the level of the plywood.

Detail
The deck is detailed to appear as staggered metal crossbearers, each covered with raised rivets.

The rails are held by raised stubs representing track spikes. Guard rails are molded as part of the model.

The plate girders have no detail on the track side but have riveting and girder detail on the exterior.

Instructions and Painting
No instructions.

St. Louis–San Francisco Railway, also known as the Frisco (SLSF) used the Shortest line Memphis-Birmingham-Pensacola slogan and the Frisco Lines logo on many of their bridges. These are are crisply printed. Aside from these white graphics, there are no other markings. A cursory search found a Frisco bridge of a different design so decorated but no doubt SLSF had many bridges that this model accurately represents. You can see one through Click here for additional images for this review, at the end of this review.

SLSF's network fanned out from St Louis, Missouri through Kansas City, Dallas, Galveston, Memphis, Pensacola, and elsewhere, so even if you are not modeling the Frisco, this bridge can authentically be at home on most layouts.

Conclusion
Atlas' Code 100 Plate Girder Bridge is a quick and easy way for you to span a narrow obstacle on your HO railroad.

It features quality molding and nickle-silver rails.

A lack of detail on the interior plates is a minor disappointment but not surprising for the generously economic price.

I am pleased with this plate girder bridge. It is a nice looking model for novice through advanced layouts. Recommended.

Please remember to mention to Atlas and vendors that you saw this model here - on RailRoad Modeling.

Click here for additional images for this review.

SUMMARY
Highs: It features quality molding and nickle-silver rails.
Lows: A lack of detail on the interior plates.
Verdict: I am pleased with this plate girder bridge. It is a nice looking model for novice through advanced layouts.
  Scale: HO Scale
  Mfg. ID: 70 000 032
  PUBLISHED: Feb 17, 2018
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.03%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 87.36%

Our Thanks to Atlas Model Railroad!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Frederick Boucher (JPTRR)
FROM: TENNESSEE, UNITED STATES

I'm a professional pilot with a degree in art. My first model was an AMT semi dump truck. Then Monogram's Lunar Lander right after the lunar landing. Next, Revell's 1/32 Bf-109G...cried havoc and released the dogs of modeling! My interests--if built before 1900, or after 1955, then I proba...

Copyright ©2018 text by Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of ModelGeek. All rights reserved.



   

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