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RailRoad Modeling
For general topics on RailRoad modeling.
Super-Detailed Steam Loco
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 6,925 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 601 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 08, 2017 - 03:27 PM GMT+7
Hi Group,

Those of you who have been around the site long enough may have seen my references to a loco I detailed long ago. Well, it ain't a figment of my imagination!

Rooting around unpacking moving boxes I found my baby: JP&T No. 102, a ZP-class 2-6-2 after her 1925 major shopping and renumbering as a "mutt".

Unfortunately, it is in disrepair. Fortunately, I have all the parts.



Here's the story. As a wee lad without the money for brass and yet inspired by Model Railroader and Model Railroad Craftsman, c. 1975, I bought my first steam loco kit: Pennsy 2-6-2 Roundhouse/MDC 2-6-2 . I really like the look of Pennsy fat boilers, Belpaire fireboxes, and the big cabs. (I don't like the PRR locos with the shorter cabs.)

Well, she ran. Grudgingly. Sometimes even through 18" radius curves without derailing. My dad had a friend who loosened up the mechanism some, and ground down some driver flanges, and it ran better.

As much as I like Pennsy steam, I liked better all the piping and external appliances. But I didn't know what it all was. Fortunately, I was able to travel to a well kept medium steam loco on display: 2-8-2 Steam Loco Illinois Central 1518. Unfortunately, back then the loco was enclosed behind a chainlink fence and it was challenging to try to sketch out a diagram of where everything seemed to go. Eventually, I removed the boiler from my kit and used my trusty Dremel to grind off cast on detail. Thus started a long-term superdetailing project. Until I got old enough to get a summer job, my allowance did not allow me to buy more than one or two Cal-Scale / Kemtron /Cary brass detail parts a month. I decided I like the boiler top check valve, lots of air cooling piping, lifting injectors, big steam turrets, smokebox front headlight, marker lamps, and many other gizmos. I attempted to create a full air brake system. I even detailed the cab even though I really couldn't see into the IC 2-8-2. I referenced brass locos in magazines.

I could not (or chose not to) afford pipe unions and such, so I made my own with Squadron sheet styrene.

Ironically, after saving my pennies to buy this kit at the then-princely sum of $40, I ended up buying upwards of $100 in detail parts and items to make this loco my own. I would head to Stan Walter's Stan's United Paints and Model Trains shop; Stan was not only a really good guy, he was also a Walthers dealer, from where I ordered my parts.

While the detail parts slowly went on, I realized that I did not like Pennsy tenders of the era, and discovered that railroads would add coal bunker capacity by raising the sides. I did so with sheet styrene, hand embossing the rivets with my math compass. (I sure didn't use it to study, as my grades showed.) [I also fashioned them while on a date! As it turned out, I was glad to have the model instead of her. Much less trouble and much more enjoyable. ]

Back then I did not develop patience to learn the skill to solder. But superglue had been released! With the new CA and old epoxy, I assembled this loco. That accounts for all the parts that have broken off.

Back then the trend was to heavily weather locos. You can tell I subscribed to that idea.

Enjoy the old girl. Even if I don't get it back together, it will hold down the RIP track as a monument to what I once was capable of. Enjoy No. 102!












Hee hee - note the HO wrench at the upper right of all th parts. I think I'll need it.
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,214 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 5 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 08, 2017 - 05:34 PM GMT+7
Nice job Fred. It really looks good, even with all the detached parts. It's interesting to see how many of us have similar interests and experiences across the spectrum of model building.
VR, Russ
Blaubar
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
Joined: December 15, 2016
KitMaker: 158 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 6 posts
Posted: Monday, January 09, 2017 - 12:07 AM GMT+7
Ha,
great little text and build there! Always nice to see some modified trains!
I am always confused by your nomenclature of wheel naming, instead of axle naming^^. You seem to know your subject so how do you know the difference between moving and non-moving axles?
like 1'E1 h2 would easily indicate one leading moving axle, E=5 powerd axles followed by one fixed non powerd axle. With the imperial system this would be 2-10-2 but no sign of the moving axle thingys.. Do you understand what I mean? Another thing, the cylinder information and specification, (the h2 for 2 hot stzeam powered cylinders) would that be added with the imperial system also somewhere or not?
Just out of curiosity.

Cheers,
/Stefab
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 6,925 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 601 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 01:53 PM GMT+7
Hallo Stefab,

Thanks for your questions.
Quoted Text

...how do you know the difference between moving and non-moving axles?



I think you are asking about powered and unpowered axles on electric and diesel-electrics? The US uses the AAR wheel arrangement system. AAR identifies axles; letters refer to powered axles, and numbers to unpowered (or idler) axles.

"A" refers to one powered axle, "B" to two powered axles in a row, "C" to three powered axles in a row, and "D" to four powered axles in a row. "1" refers to one idler axle, and "2" to two idler axles in a row. A dash ("–") separates trucks, or wheel assemblies. A plus sign ("+") refers to articulation.


Quoted Text

...cylinder information and specification, (the h2 for 2 hot steam powered cylinders) would that be added with the imperial system also somewhere or not?



I do not know much about that. I am not aware of US steam locos bearing that data. Some railroads would stencil the locomotive class designation around the engine number, and some used "S" to indicate superheated steam. I think Great Northern stenciled cylinder size under their cabs. That is all that I am aware of.
HARV
#012
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wyoming, United States
Joined: November 07, 2003
KitMaker: 2,800 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 101 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 21, 2017 - 02:38 PM GMT+7
Cool Fred. Hopefully you will post some photos of it once the repairs are completed.

Thanks,
Randy
Blaubar
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
Joined: December 15, 2016
KitMaker: 158 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 6 posts
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 06:30 PM GMT+7
Frederick,
Sorry for the late reply.
I was not talking about powered axles but moving/steering axles.
The BR52's 1'E h2 differentiates this. Numbers are non powered axles, letters are powered axles. Additionally, the '''' ' indicates a moving /steering axle. And of course the cylinder information (h2) in this case..

It seems the US would make this a 2 10 2 engine, most of the info is not present as such. At least most people over there use this weird road wheel count thing 2-10-2 or 4-6-2 on the forums. Though your apparent AAR system seems to be similar to the intl standard one. Quite interesting stuff in general, these steam locomotives.

/Stefan